/page/2
Three Rivers. #water

Three Rivers. #water

"Zero Water"
I was in Bed Bath & Beyond and couldn’t help but notice this 13 dollar water filter and the fine print on the side of the packaging. In short, the last paragraph instructs you to not use the filter unless the water has been rendered safe to drink by other water treatment (e.g., filtration and disinfection). Its funny, and frustrating, considering the financial pressures that municipal water treatment systems are under. 

"Zero Water"

I was in Bed Bath & Beyond and couldn’t help but notice this 13 dollar water filter and the fine print on the side of the packaging. In short, the last paragraph instructs you to not use the filter unless the water has been rendered safe to drink by other water treatment (e.g., filtration and disinfection). Its funny, and frustrating, considering the financial pressures that municipal water treatment systems are under. 

5 Reasons Why We Don’t Bike to Work

The environmental benefits of biking a short (< 5 miles) distance rather than using a internal combustion motorized vehicle are so numerous and significant I am not going to waste internet elaborating on them. (Yes, it even saves water). They are similar to the obvious benefits of putting your empty Coke can in the recycling bin versus throwing it in the trash. The question then becomes: Why don’t we consistently bike to work? Developing some of my own personal excuses, here is why I suspect we don’t:

1.  Out of Shape

Biking is work, exerting a force over a distance. Using your legs to turn the crank to move your body is somewhat like staring at yourself in a mirror. A couple of things become immediately obvious to me: my weight and my aerobic capacity, and I don’t like what I see. There is a sublime ignorance to sitting in a car. I can’t sense how my physical body is affecting the transportation, and I don’t become winded by stepping on the gas pedal. And this ignorance is comforting, like putting your head in the sand. When this ignorance is shattered it can be tough to pick up the pieces. Thus, I don’t like to bike to work because I don’t like being reminded of how I have neglected my physical self prior to 9AM (or after 5PM). It’s the same reason that I dont step on the scale after brushing my teeth. Its just…easier that way. 

2.  The Raw Environment 

The environment can be intimidating, even a little scary. Maybe thats why most newscasts in America do the weather right after the top stories, and the Weather Channel can make a very pedestrian rainy day seem like the next weather apocalypse. You need to know: should I be worrying about this? Most of the time that answer is no, unless you are on a bike, then the answer is yes. The wind, rain, snow, sun (do I need sunscreen?), are all factors of which you have no control over, and can be quite menacing when you are pedaling yourself to work against the elements. This lack of control, this subservience to nature, can seem pretty intimidating. It is the opposite of how we prefer things, most of the time. My hair gets messed up, I get wet, the wind dries out my face - nature is messing with my physical self.  

All of this makes the climate control, reclining seats, and windshield of our automobiles very attractive. I can get to where I am going in total comfort, unaffected by and somewhat oblivious to the raw nature on the other side of the glass.

3.  All My Stuff

My computer, charger, phone, phone charger, soccer cleats, textbook, pencils, headphones and water bottle all weigh me down. And I need all of these things, or at least I think I do. I can’t bike, because how would I get all my stuff where I need it. It makes the trunk of my car seem like something I cannot live without. I need the space.  

However, if my life were simpler, I would not have all this cargo (weight) to transport along with my body to work. In this way, using a bike as primary transportation requires a revaluation of the material complexity of my life. This can be quite challenging, and makes biking less attractive. 

4.  Don’t Live Near Work

Many of us live relatively far away from where we must commonly be (i.e., the office). This wasn’t always the case, and we have the Interstate Highway System to thank for that, in part. Don’t get me wrong: the highway system in America is a national treasure; however, prior to its existence, Levittown was not capable of existing, and driving miles and miles into centralized commercial/industrial locations was just not a thing. 

This suburban development in America has taking biking (or walking) to work from a common occurrence to something rife with nostalgia, or even odd. But now, in the age of $4.00 gasoline, climate change and traffic jams we must ask: why do we live this far away from where we are often required to be?

5.  Solitude

I can’t tweet while biking. I can’t tell all my “friends” how my night went while I am biking that morning, or what funny thing my roommate said at breakfast. I can’t look at your pictures on Facebook. I can’t call, email or text. I can’t sneak a peek at the headlines. I can’t purchase some new shoes. I just need to be a human being, alone (unless tandem bike), with my own legs and my own brain. Perhaps this is something that has become very difficult to do. Am I capable of being ‘offline’ long enough to bike to work? 

ACE14 Onsite Program

This years Annual Conference Program is now available online. There is also a corresponding mobile application to help folks schedule what is sure to be a busy few days in Boston. 

Its The Little ThingsHere&#8217;s a picture of my labmate, Joseph, working the Zetasizer. It measures the surface charge of small particles (diameter &lt; 50 micrometers) that might be present in drinking water, which could include innocuous things, such as clay, or more not-so-innocuous things, such as Giardia. We are interested in the surface charge of particles because this surface charge can keep particles from being effectively coagulated and/or filtered. We can predict or model the effects of drinking water treatment if we have an idea of this surface charge. That said, measuring the surface charge is, as they say in Boston, &#8220;wicked hard&#8221;. But, we can correlate this surface charge to electrophoretic mobility (i.e., how particles move in an electric field), which is much easier to measure. This is why Joseph is geeking out with a microscope and an analog readout microprocessor&#8212;that, and hipster street-cred. We have a more modern instrument in the laboratory that can do this measurement but sometimes we like to keep it old school. 

Its The Little Things

Here’s a picture of my labmate, Joseph, working the Zetasizer. It measures the surface charge of small particles (diameter < 50 micrometers) that might be present in drinking water, which could include innocuous things, such as clay, or more not-so-innocuous things, such as Giardia. 

We are interested in the surface charge of particles because this surface charge can keep particles from being effectively coagulated and/or filtered. We can predict or model the effects of drinking water treatment if we have an idea of this surface charge. 

That said, measuring the surface charge is, as they say in Boston, “wicked hard”. But, we can correlate this surface charge to 
electrophoretic mobility (i.e., how particles move in an electric field), which is much easier to measure. This is why Joseph is geeking out with a microscope and an analog readout microprocessor—that, and hipster street-cred. We have a more modern instrument in the laboratory that can do this measurement but sometimes we like to keep it old school. 

#coagulation #water

#coagulation #water

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on SpitSaliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC&#8217;s.

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on Spit

Saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.

Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

(via women-in-science)

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

#labninja #snowday

All Hands on Earth: Where Does Your Water Come From?

So few people are aware of where their water comes from. This ignorance is inherently linked to environmental and infrastructure issues. Protecting and investing in our natural and built infrastructure becomes easier when we acknowledge the complexity, beauty and value of our drinking water systems. 

Also, this is just a rad map. Check it out…

Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running

Last week I eclipsed a significant training landmark: I’ve run over 1000 miles this year. At first this seems like a big accomplishment. It took 170 hours of running to do this. Some people have asked me how I find time to run almost every day; however, when put into the context of the global water crisis, the time I spent running pales by comparison to the hours of work done by those collecting water every day.

For example take Malawi, a wonderful country I have had the pleasure of visiting twice while volunteering for Water For People. A recent paper by Stanford University1 estimates that the average amount of time someone in Malawi spends fetching water is 32 minutes, every day. This translates into 195 hours, every year. This is significantly more time than I have spent running this year. And water is quite heavy, 8.3 lbs. per gallon. A 5-gallon bucket weights over 40 lbs. Obviously, I would not make it very far running if I had that much extra weight to carry.

This illustrates the severity of the situation in Malawi and many other developing areas. In just one day, it is estimated that more than 152 million hours of women and girl’s time is consumed collecting water for domestic use2. Taken together, the lost productive time due to water collection is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Wal-Mart, UPS, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger, according to Gary White, co-founder of water.org.

So, if you find yourself remotely impressed by the amount of running I have done this year, please consider the immeasurable work done by the hundreds of millions of people every day to acquire water.

I have achieved 50% of my fundraising goal for the NYC Marathon. Thank you to all those who have supported this cause. Anyone interested in donating to my Water For People - NYC Marathon fundraiser can do so through this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

1. http://woods.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/files/FreshwaterAvailability.pdf

2. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2010). Progress on Sanitation and Drinking-Water, 2010 Update.

This is why I am running.

Sometimes training for a marathon is fun, other times its kind of lame. As the time demands of another semester start ramping up at UMass, running now has a tendency to become just another item on my daily list of tasks. At this point, hundreds of miles in, each individual run seems a little less significant, and this can lead to a reduction in motivation. 

This video serves as a refreshing reminder of why I am running: to support the work of Water For People. Watching it again has definitely invigorated my training (and my fundraising). I hope others find it encouraging as well. 

Speaking of fundraising, I am approaching 50% of my goal! Thank you to all who have donated. For those wishing to donate, please follow this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill


Global Water is a Marathon: Is it Running?

There is a significant amount of training that goes into a marathon. During the course of preparing runners complete at least 250 miles, most much more. Therefore, if you watch a marathon and you see a person run 26.2 miles you are only witnessing 10% of the running work that person has done, at most. The key to marathon success is sustained running over a long period of time. Day after day. 

The same goes for international water development. “Is water still running?” is perhaps the most important question when considering water initiatives worldwide. In this video, Water For People CEO, Ned Breslin, outlines the focus his organization places on answering that question, while describing the technology developed by Water For People that helps them make sure water is running, all the time. 

http://www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

Three Rivers. #water

Three Rivers. #water

"Zero Water"
I was in Bed Bath &amp; Beyond and couldn&#8217;t help but notice this 13 dollar water filter and the fine print on the side of the packaging. In short, the last paragraph instructs you to not use the filter unless the water has been rendered safe to drink by other water treatment (e.g., filtration and disinfection). Its funny, and frustrating, considering the financial pressures that municipal water treatment systems are under. 

"Zero Water"

I was in Bed Bath & Beyond and couldn’t help but notice this 13 dollar water filter and the fine print on the side of the packaging. In short, the last paragraph instructs you to not use the filter unless the water has been rendered safe to drink by other water treatment (e.g., filtration and disinfection). Its funny, and frustrating, considering the financial pressures that municipal water treatment systems are under. 

5 Reasons Why We Don’t Bike to Work

The environmental benefits of biking a short (< 5 miles) distance rather than using a internal combustion motorized vehicle are so numerous and significant I am not going to waste internet elaborating on them. (Yes, it even saves water). They are similar to the obvious benefits of putting your empty Coke can in the recycling bin versus throwing it in the trash. The question then becomes: Why don’t we consistently bike to work? Developing some of my own personal excuses, here is why I suspect we don’t:

1.  Out of Shape

Biking is work, exerting a force over a distance. Using your legs to turn the crank to move your body is somewhat like staring at yourself in a mirror. A couple of things become immediately obvious to me: my weight and my aerobic capacity, and I don’t like what I see. There is a sublime ignorance to sitting in a car. I can’t sense how my physical body is affecting the transportation, and I don’t become winded by stepping on the gas pedal. And this ignorance is comforting, like putting your head in the sand. When this ignorance is shattered it can be tough to pick up the pieces. Thus, I don’t like to bike to work because I don’t like being reminded of how I have neglected my physical self prior to 9AM (or after 5PM). It’s the same reason that I dont step on the scale after brushing my teeth. Its just…easier that way. 

2.  The Raw Environment 

The environment can be intimidating, even a little scary. Maybe thats why most newscasts in America do the weather right after the top stories, and the Weather Channel can make a very pedestrian rainy day seem like the next weather apocalypse. You need to know: should I be worrying about this? Most of the time that answer is no, unless you are on a bike, then the answer is yes. The wind, rain, snow, sun (do I need sunscreen?), are all factors of which you have no control over, and can be quite menacing when you are pedaling yourself to work against the elements. This lack of control, this subservience to nature, can seem pretty intimidating. It is the opposite of how we prefer things, most of the time. My hair gets messed up, I get wet, the wind dries out my face - nature is messing with my physical self.  

All of this makes the climate control, reclining seats, and windshield of our automobiles very attractive. I can get to where I am going in total comfort, unaffected by and somewhat oblivious to the raw nature on the other side of the glass.

3.  All My Stuff

My computer, charger, phone, phone charger, soccer cleats, textbook, pencils, headphones and water bottle all weigh me down. And I need all of these things, or at least I think I do. I can’t bike, because how would I get all my stuff where I need it. It makes the trunk of my car seem like something I cannot live without. I need the space.  

However, if my life were simpler, I would not have all this cargo (weight) to transport along with my body to work. In this way, using a bike as primary transportation requires a revaluation of the material complexity of my life. This can be quite challenging, and makes biking less attractive. 

4.  Don’t Live Near Work

Many of us live relatively far away from where we must commonly be (i.e., the office). This wasn’t always the case, and we have the Interstate Highway System to thank for that, in part. Don’t get me wrong: the highway system in America is a national treasure; however, prior to its existence, Levittown was not capable of existing, and driving miles and miles into centralized commercial/industrial locations was just not a thing. 

This suburban development in America has taking biking (or walking) to work from a common occurrence to something rife with nostalgia, or even odd. But now, in the age of $4.00 gasoline, climate change and traffic jams we must ask: why do we live this far away from where we are often required to be?

5.  Solitude

I can’t tweet while biking. I can’t tell all my “friends” how my night went while I am biking that morning, or what funny thing my roommate said at breakfast. I can’t look at your pictures on Facebook. I can’t call, email or text. I can’t sneak a peek at the headlines. I can’t purchase some new shoes. I just need to be a human being, alone (unless tandem bike), with my own legs and my own brain. Perhaps this is something that has become very difficult to do. Am I capable of being ‘offline’ long enough to bike to work? 

ACE14 Onsite Program

This years Annual Conference Program is now available online. There is also a corresponding mobile application to help folks schedule what is sure to be a busy few days in Boston. 

Its The Little ThingsHere&#8217;s a picture of my labmate, Joseph, working the Zetasizer. It measures the surface charge of small particles (diameter &lt; 50 micrometers) that might be present in drinking water, which could include innocuous things, such as clay, or more not-so-innocuous things, such as Giardia. We are interested in the surface charge of particles because this surface charge can keep particles from being effectively coagulated and/or filtered. We can predict or model the effects of drinking water treatment if we have an idea of this surface charge. That said, measuring the surface charge is, as they say in Boston, &#8220;wicked hard&#8221;. But, we can correlate this surface charge to electrophoretic mobility (i.e., how particles move in an electric field), which is much easier to measure. This is why Joseph is geeking out with a microscope and an analog readout microprocessor&#8212;that, and hipster street-cred. We have a more modern instrument in the laboratory that can do this measurement but sometimes we like to keep it old school. 

Its The Little Things

Here’s a picture of my labmate, Joseph, working the Zetasizer. It measures the surface charge of small particles (diameter < 50 micrometers) that might be present in drinking water, which could include innocuous things, such as clay, or more not-so-innocuous things, such as Giardia. 

We are interested in the surface charge of particles because this surface charge can keep particles from being effectively coagulated and/or filtered. We can predict or model the effects of drinking water treatment if we have an idea of this surface charge. 

That said, measuring the surface charge is, as they say in Boston, “wicked hard”. But, we can correlate this surface charge to 
electrophoretic mobility (i.e., how particles move in an electric field), which is much easier to measure. This is why Joseph is geeking out with a microscope and an analog readout microprocessor—that, and hipster street-cred. We have a more modern instrument in the laboratory that can do this measurement but sometimes we like to keep it old school. 

#coagulation #water

#coagulation #water

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on SpitSaliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC&#8217;s.

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on Spit

Saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.

Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

(via women-in-science)

#same

#same

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

#labninja #snowday

All Hands on Earth: Where Does Your Water Come From?

So few people are aware of where their water comes from. This ignorance is inherently linked to environmental and infrastructure issues. Protecting and investing in our natural and built infrastructure becomes easier when we acknowledge the complexity, beauty and value of our drinking water systems. 

Also, this is just a rad map. Check it out…

Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running

Last week I eclipsed a significant training landmark: I’ve run over 1000 miles this year. At first this seems like a big accomplishment. It took 170 hours of running to do this. Some people have asked me how I find time to run almost every day; however, when put into the context of the global water crisis, the time I spent running pales by comparison to the hours of work done by those collecting water every day.

For example take Malawi, a wonderful country I have had the pleasure of visiting twice while volunteering for Water For People. A recent paper by Stanford University1 estimates that the average amount of time someone in Malawi spends fetching water is 32 minutes, every day. This translates into 195 hours, every year. This is significantly more time than I have spent running this year. And water is quite heavy, 8.3 lbs. per gallon. A 5-gallon bucket weights over 40 lbs. Obviously, I would not make it very far running if I had that much extra weight to carry.

This illustrates the severity of the situation in Malawi and many other developing areas. In just one day, it is estimated that more than 152 million hours of women and girl’s time is consumed collecting water for domestic use2. Taken together, the lost productive time due to water collection is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Wal-Mart, UPS, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger, according to Gary White, co-founder of water.org.

So, if you find yourself remotely impressed by the amount of running I have done this year, please consider the immeasurable work done by the hundreds of millions of people every day to acquire water.

I have achieved 50% of my fundraising goal for the NYC Marathon. Thank you to all those who have supported this cause. Anyone interested in donating to my Water For People - NYC Marathon fundraiser can do so through this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

1. http://woods.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/files/FreshwaterAvailability.pdf

2. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2010). Progress on Sanitation and Drinking-Water, 2010 Update.

This is why I am running.

Sometimes training for a marathon is fun, other times its kind of lame. As the time demands of another semester start ramping up at UMass, running now has a tendency to become just another item on my daily list of tasks. At this point, hundreds of miles in, each individual run seems a little less significant, and this can lead to a reduction in motivation. 

This video serves as a refreshing reminder of why I am running: to support the work of Water For People. Watching it again has definitely invigorated my training (and my fundraising). I hope others find it encouraging as well. 

Speaking of fundraising, I am approaching 50% of my goal! Thank you to all who have donated. For those wishing to donate, please follow this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill


Global Water is a Marathon: Is it Running?

There is a significant amount of training that goes into a marathon. During the course of preparing runners complete at least 250 miles, most much more. Therefore, if you watch a marathon and you see a person run 26.2 miles you are only witnessing 10% of the running work that person has done, at most. The key to marathon success is sustained running over a long period of time. Day after day. 

The same goes for international water development. “Is water still running?” is perhaps the most important question when considering water initiatives worldwide. In this video, Water For People CEO, Ned Breslin, outlines the focus his organization places on answering that question, while describing the technology developed by Water For People that helps them make sure water is running, all the time. 

http://www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

5 Reasons Why We Don’t Bike to Work
Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running

About:

A flow of topics related to water and the environment.

Joe Goodwill, PE, LEED-AP

Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Massachusetts Amherst


View Joe Goodwill's profile on LinkedIn

Following: