/page/2
#coagulation #water

#coagulation #water

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on SpitSaliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on Spit

Saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.

Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

(via women-in-science)

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

#labninja #snowday

All Hands on Earth: Where Does Your Water Come From?

So few people are aware of where their water comes from. This ignorance is inherently linked to environmental and infrastructure issues. Protecting and investing in our natural and built infrastructure becomes easier when we acknowledge the complexity, beauty and value of our drinking water systems. 

Also, this is just a rad map. Check it out…

Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running

Last week I eclipsed a significant training landmark: I’ve run over 1000 miles this year. At first this seems like a big accomplishment. It took 170 hours of running to do this. Some people have asked me how I find time to run almost every day; however, when put into the context of the global water crisis, the time I spent running pales by comparison to the hours of work done by those collecting water every day.

For example take Malawi, a wonderful country I have had the pleasure of visiting twice while volunteering for Water For People. A recent paper by Stanford University1 estimates that the average amount of time someone in Malawi spends fetching water is 32 minutes, every day. This translates into 195 hours, every year. This is significantly more time than I have spent running this year. And water is quite heavy, 8.3 lbs. per gallon. A 5-gallon bucket weights over 40 lbs. Obviously, I would not make it very far running if I had that much extra weight to carry.

This illustrates the severity of the situation in Malawi and many other developing areas. In just one day, it is estimated that more than 152 million hours of women and girl’s time is consumed collecting water for domestic use2. Taken together, the lost productive time due to water collection is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Wal-Mart, UPS, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger, according to Gary White, co-founder of water.org.

So, if you find yourself remotely impressed by the amount of running I have done this year, please consider the immeasurable work done by the hundreds of millions of people every day to acquire water.

I have achieved 50% of my fundraising goal for the NYC Marathon. Thank you to all those who have supported this cause. Anyone interested in donating to my Water For People - NYC Marathon fundraiser can do so through this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

1. http://woods.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/files/FreshwaterAvailability.pdf

2. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2010). Progress on Sanitation and Drinking-Water, 2010 Update.

This is why I am running.

Sometimes training for a marathon is fun, other times its kind of lame. As the time demands of another semester start ramping up at UMass, running now has a tendency to become just another item on my daily list of tasks. At this point, hundreds of miles in, each individual run seems a little less significant, and this can lead to a reduction in motivation. 

This video serves as a refreshing reminder of why I am running: to support the work of Water For People. Watching it again has definitely invigorated my training (and my fundraising). I hope others find it encouraging as well. 

Speaking of fundraising, I am approaching 50% of my goal! Thank you to all who have donated. For those wishing to donate, please follow this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill


Global Water is a Marathon: Is it Running?

There is a significant amount of training that goes into a marathon. During the course of preparing runners complete at least 250 miles, most much more. Therefore, if you watch a marathon and you see a person run 26.2 miles you are only witnessing 10% of the running work that person has done, at most. The key to marathon success is sustained running over a long period of time. Day after day. 

The same goes for international water development. “Is water still running?” is perhaps the most important question when considering water initiatives worldwide. In this video, Water For People CEO, Ned Breslin, outlines the focus his organization places on answering that question, while describing the technology developed by Water For People that helps them make sure water is running, all the time. 

http://www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

My Fundraiser Page (Link)

Running for Water

On November 3rd, I will run the New York City Marathon to support Water For People. Water For People envisions a world where everyone has access to safe drinking water and suitable sanitation facilities, forever. The task they are undertaking is great—over a billion people lack access to clean water and sanitation. Also, many attempts to increase water and sanitation access have failed. However, I believe that Water For People has an outstanding approach that includes developing local entrepreneurs, expanding education and partnering with local stakeholders—all combining to make programs that have a lasting impact. In addition, Water For People has been rated in the highest possible category by Charity Navigator for 10 consecutive years, placing them in the top 1% of charities nationwide

Over the next two months, I will be raising awareness and funds for this great cause (in addition to doing a fair amount of training runs). I will be joined by a fantastic team of six other runners, all doing our best to complete the marathon while supporting Water For People. As part of my entry into the NYC Marathon I have committed to raising $2,500 for Water For People. Donations to my fundraising campaign can be given online at www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

I hope you will join me in this cause. In the coming weeks, I will be blogging more about Water For People’s work, and the experience of marathon training. Thank you!


#coagulation #water

#coagulation #water

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on SpitSaliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

laboratoryequipment:

Fuel Cell Runs on Spit

Saliva-powered micro-sized microbial fuel cells can produce minute amounts of energy sufficient to run on-chip applications, according to an international team of engineers.

Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn State, credits the idea to fellow researcher Justine Mink. “The idea was Justine’s because she was thinking about sensors for such things as glucose monitoring for diabetics and she wondered if a mini microbial fuel cell could be used,” Logan says. “There is a lot of organic stuff in saliva.”

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fuel-cell-runs-spit

More fun with MFC’s.

(via women-in-science)

#same

#same

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

operating a water treatment pilot plant and assessing the impacts of using ferrate as an oxidant

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

The first 350 minutes of my day were not fun.

#labninja #snowday

All Hands on Earth: Where Does Your Water Come From?

So few people are aware of where their water comes from. This ignorance is inherently linked to environmental and infrastructure issues. Protecting and investing in our natural and built infrastructure becomes easier when we acknowledge the complexity, beauty and value of our drinking water systems. 

Also, this is just a rad map. Check it out…

Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running

Last week I eclipsed a significant training landmark: I’ve run over 1000 miles this year. At first this seems like a big accomplishment. It took 170 hours of running to do this. Some people have asked me how I find time to run almost every day; however, when put into the context of the global water crisis, the time I spent running pales by comparison to the hours of work done by those collecting water every day.

For example take Malawi, a wonderful country I have had the pleasure of visiting twice while volunteering for Water For People. A recent paper by Stanford University1 estimates that the average amount of time someone in Malawi spends fetching water is 32 minutes, every day. This translates into 195 hours, every year. This is significantly more time than I have spent running this year. And water is quite heavy, 8.3 lbs. per gallon. A 5-gallon bucket weights over 40 lbs. Obviously, I would not make it very far running if I had that much extra weight to carry.

This illustrates the severity of the situation in Malawi and many other developing areas. In just one day, it is estimated that more than 152 million hours of women and girl’s time is consumed collecting water for domestic use2. Taken together, the lost productive time due to water collection is greater than the combined number of hours worked in a week by employees at Wal-Mart, UPS, McDonald’s, IBM, Target, and Kroger, according to Gary White, co-founder of water.org.

So, if you find yourself remotely impressed by the amount of running I have done this year, please consider the immeasurable work done by the hundreds of millions of people every day to acquire water.

I have achieved 50% of my fundraising goal for the NYC Marathon. Thank you to all those who have supported this cause. Anyone interested in donating to my Water For People - NYC Marathon fundraiser can do so through this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

1. http://woods.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/files/FreshwaterAvailability.pdf

2. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2010). Progress on Sanitation and Drinking-Water, 2010 Update.

This is why I am running.

Sometimes training for a marathon is fun, other times its kind of lame. As the time demands of another semester start ramping up at UMass, running now has a tendency to become just another item on my daily list of tasks. At this point, hundreds of miles in, each individual run seems a little less significant, and this can lead to a reduction in motivation. 

This video serves as a refreshing reminder of why I am running: to support the work of Water For People. Watching it again has definitely invigorated my training (and my fundraising). I hope others find it encouraging as well. 

Speaking of fundraising, I am approaching 50% of my goal! Thank you to all who have donated. For those wishing to donate, please follow this link: www.crowdrise.com/goodwill


Global Water is a Marathon: Is it Running?

There is a significant amount of training that goes into a marathon. During the course of preparing runners complete at least 250 miles, most much more. Therefore, if you watch a marathon and you see a person run 26.2 miles you are only witnessing 10% of the running work that person has done, at most. The key to marathon success is sustained running over a long period of time. Day after day. 

The same goes for international water development. “Is water still running?” is perhaps the most important question when considering water initiatives worldwide. In this video, Water For People CEO, Ned Breslin, outlines the focus his organization places on answering that question, while describing the technology developed by Water For People that helps them make sure water is running, all the time. 

http://www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

My Fundraiser Page (Link)

Running for Water

On November 3rd, I will run the New York City Marathon to support Water For People. Water For People envisions a world where everyone has access to safe drinking water and suitable sanitation facilities, forever. The task they are undertaking is great—over a billion people lack access to clean water and sanitation. Also, many attempts to increase water and sanitation access have failed. However, I believe that Water For People has an outstanding approach that includes developing local entrepreneurs, expanding education and partnering with local stakeholders—all combining to make programs that have a lasting impact. In addition, Water For People has been rated in the highest possible category by Charity Navigator for 10 consecutive years, placing them in the top 1% of charities nationwide

Over the next two months, I will be raising awareness and funds for this great cause (in addition to doing a fair amount of training runs). I will be joined by a fantastic team of six other runners, all doing our best to complete the marathon while supporting Water For People. As part of my entry into the NYC Marathon I have committed to raising $2,500 for Water For People. Donations to my fundraising campaign can be given online at www.crowdrise.com/goodwill

I hope you will join me in this cause. In the coming weeks, I will be blogging more about Water For People’s work, and the experience of marathon training. Thank you!


Global Water is a Marathon: 170 Hours of Running
Running for Water

About:

A flow of topics related to water and the environment.

Joe Goodwill, PE, LEED-AP

Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Massachusetts.

twitter: @josephgoodwill http://www.linkedin.com/in/joegoodwill

Following: